Solar Eclipse, a Glimpse of Tolkienian Humor!

Next time you see the see the Sun and the Moon, hopefully, it will not merely an incandescent ball of fire and a cold crater ridden piece of rock, rather your heart will be drawn to the unrequited love story between the angelic beings, Tilion and Arien. May be, it is not as unrequited as I make it to be, thanks to the eclipses!  And the brilliance of Illuvathar’s creation… pointing back to the brilliance of God’s handiwork.

Today’s Solar Eclipse gives an opportunity to talk about Tolkien’s romantic sly sense of Humor. As I was looking at the (partial) Solar eclipse at Houston with some friends from work, I remembered that Tolkien, in his creation mythology in the Silmarillion, has an intriguing story about the creation of the Sun and the Moon.

When Illuvathar, God, sang the world into creation, in the first go, the earth was lit by light of the stars and the white trees of Valinor (Paradise). After the loss of that light, the Sun and the Moon were created. Sun is a female Valar, an angelic being, Arien. The Moon is male angelic being Tilion. Arien and Tilion are in charge of steering the sun and the moon. The Sun was meant the govern Earth’s day light, moon the night.

Tolkien says that Tilion is an unsteady hand steering the Moon, often in incorrect paths, thus ending up on the same side along the Sun. The idea being that Tilion can’t help steering recklessly towards the Sun, being love sick about Arien. This is the romantic in Tolkien. In order to explain the Moon showing up during the day, he comes up with a romantic solution that is humorous in the Tolkienian sense.

I don’t know if Tolkien develops this theme further into what Solar and Lunar eclipses mean, in the mythology, as to the relationship between Tilion and Arien. But that is very Tolkienis thing to do – develop some intriguing possibilities and leaving the rest for imagination!

Next time you see the see the Sun and the Moon, hopefully, it will not merely an incandescent ball of fire and a cold crater ridden piece of rock, rather your heart will be drawn to the mythic ballet of unrequited love between the angelic beings, Tilion and Arien. May be, it is not as unrequited as I make it to be, thanks to the eclipses!  And the brilliance of Illuvathar’s creation… pointing back to the brilliance of God’s handiwork. All this to say this is Tolkien’s humorous way of adding a little bit more mythic meaning to our otherwise dreary existence on planet Earth!

The Art of Mindful Emotions

Part of the reason why political discourse is so broken in Universities and the society at large is because people tend to blame the other people for the unpleasant emotions that others trigger in them. When our emotions get triggered by something that is happening we have to stop and ask ourselves, “Do I do well to get triggered?” 

This Monday, we were discussing Jonah 4. Jonah 4:4 “Do you do well to be angry?” (ESV) stood out to me. It seemed to me that God was, in this ESV translation, phrasing the question from the point of view of Person-Centered Therapy (PCT). God’s approach is a very patient way of dialogue than a critical way of judging. God-like, in this case, the PCT therapist will attempt to try to look at the problem from the point of view of the client and try to ask questions that places the agency on the client.

Angering is a Verb:

Often when I think someone is making me angry, I think that the problem is with the other person. A PCT therapist will tell me that I am not angry at someone bur rather that I am allowing myself to angry or I am angering. The PCT phrasing, of making angering into a verb, puts the agency/responsibility for being angry on me. In many ways, God is doing this with Jonah.

God, in asking Jonah to prophesy destruction of Nineveh and then deciding to have mercy, changed the rules of the game on Jonah. Then, Jonah’s prophetic career was on line. One may be able to empathize with Jonah for being angry at God. But God helps Jonah see that he alone was responsible or how he was feeling and asks Jonah if that is what he really wants.

Anger vs Empathy:

Anger and empathy do not go together. When one is angry one cannot empathize with others. Jonah was angry that his prophetic reputation was at stake because God changed he rules of the game. In that anger he couldn’t empathize with the Ninevites. He couldn’t see that in his reputation being at stake, as in the failure of his prophetic word, meant that a whole city of over a 100 thousand people were being saved. His anger blinded his ability for empathy.

Mindful Emotions:

No amount of reasoning about saving people would have moved Jonah as long as he was stuck angry. So God had to first of all ask him to pay attention to his anger and question if his allowing himself to get angry helps at all. The point of God’s question was to get Jonah to be more mindful about his emotions and its broader impact. Only after increased mindfulness does God go on to talk about His heart and mercy for the Ninevites.

This lesson of being mindful of our emotions as a way of raising our ability to listen and be empathic is critical for personal relationships and for communal cohesiveness. Part of the reason why political discourse is so broken in Universities and the society at large is because people think it is ok blame others for the unpleasant emotions that others trigger in them. When our emotions get triggered by something that is happening we have to stop and ask ourselves, “Do I do well to get triggered?”

Someone may ask, isn’t there a rightful place for righteous anger. Yes, there is, but not when the need of the hour is more thoughtfulness, deliberation and listening. If you see someone abusing/hurting a weak person, then that is a place to allow one’s adrenaline and indignation to fuel an act in defense of the weak. Here is where the art of mindful emotions comes. Wisdom is in knowing when to allow one’s emotions rush into action and when to step back to listen. My sense is this – more than ever our society needs God-like thoughtful empathic dialoguers, than Jonah-like quick-triggered volatile reactionaries, both on the alt-Right and the violent-Left!

The Best Day of My Life Yet!

Over the past few months, as I have been praying, meditating, talking with folks about ordination the phrase that God formulated in me, spiritually speaking is, to be ordained is to rest in the love of God and invite people to experience the love of Christ. This is the “why” that I have been looking for. This is the ax that will sharpen my spear. This is the anchor that will prevent me from being buffeted by the relentless waves of evanescent fascinations. This is what Keirkegaard talks about when he says, “purity of heart is to will one thing.” 

I feel like I almost had an ontological change today! Perhaps not as dramatic as a pupa becoming a butterfly but a change to(ward) a new Identity. An identity that I find profoundly freeing.  Let me un-dramatize things a bit. Today, the Session of First Presbyterian Church heard my vision/call and voted unanimously (I am told) to recommend to be ordained as a Pastor under ECO. I still need to go through a long process with ECO to be ordained, but this vote of confidence gets the process started. I have a long road towards becoming ordained. I do not want to count the chicken before the eggs hatch. However, I want to take this special moment in my life and stake stock of the adventure that the good Lord has been taking me on.

3 years ago, in the Fall of 2014, after working for 10 years in Software development, mostly project management, I quit my job and went full time to the seminary following my call into a life of ministry of loving God and neighbor. It was a step out of safety into a new adventure. I did not know how the adventure was doing to turn out. By the grace of God, I graduated with a M.Div. magna cum laude, but the journey was not quite complete then. I still was not sure what kind of twists and turns the adventure is going to take. 

An important step in the adventure is the return back to the full time work life. After spending months in prayerful discernment, I finally landed at First Presbyterian Church (FPC) as a Church Planting Pioneer. Thanks be to God! 

 

Today is the best day of my life because, today, I was shepherded into the first steps of the final leg of the journey – to be ordained a reverend! It happened at the Session of the Pastors and Ruling Elders of meeting at FPC. The session spent a few minutes hearing my call to ministry and then voted to place me “under care” in order to be ordained through ECO. 

Question: Why does this event make today the best day of my life yet?

To appreciate why the beginning of the journey to ordination is the best days of my life one has to first understand the problem of my life… the problem of my life is that on a given day when I wake up in the morning I think I will to become a writer… when I am sipping coffee at Starbucks, feeling the heart tug of some vague tune of Pink Floyd coming over the speakers, I think I could try my hand at music… (in fact I bought a key board that I haven’t touched in months!) then when I see Netflix on my wind down to go to bed, taking notes on what was great on a given scene, or, what went wrong, I think perhaps I should try my hand at the movie business, really!  

This vacillation is the typical millennial problem of not committing to anything while being intrigued by too many fascinations. A typical millennial life with too many interests is more like a broom that just cleans up after people who have cut their teeth doing something well. A spear that does not come down to a point has no target to hit. The problem with being swayed by the vagaries of my momentary enchantments is not that my interests are too widely spread out, but rather I do not quite have a “why” around which to galvanize my resolute pursuits.

Over the past few months, as I have been praying, meditating, talking with folks about ordination the phrase that God formulated in me, spiritually speaking is, to be ordained is to rest in the love of God and invite people to experience the love of Christ. This is the “why” that I have been looking for. This is the iron that will sharpen my spear. This is the anchor that will prevent me from being buffeted by the relentless waves of my evanescent fascinations. This is what Keirkegaard talks about when he says, “purity of heart is to will one thing.” Thus I am freed from the tyranny of too many traumatizing options to choose from.

This apprehension of the inner “why” will fuel my activities, whether it be writing about the love of God or listening to hurt-angry people or preaching Christ. There is a deep freedom in knowing the “why” towards which my activities need to be directed as against being cursed with the tyranny of choice, having to choose from a plethora of options that entices my fancy. 

Today is the best day of my life yet because I am beginning to see the new identity crack open from the cocoon. A meandering larva becomes a pupa stuck in a cocoon, dormant. Then only when it ontologically changes to a butterfly that it comes fully to itself, knowing the “why” of its being – to spread its wings out and fly! My time in the world of software was one of meandering through many different interesting terrains… my time at the seminary was like the pupa that was incubating by without much movement, at times frustrating. Now the cocoon has begun cracking up and I am slowly emerging, out spreading out my wings and realizing that the whole point of my life – everything that has happened, everything I have endured, everything that has enchanted me had one end – is to rest in the love of Christ and invite people into experiencing how much Christ loves them! This is what freedom in Christ looks like for me in this phase of my life.

Reforging Broken Dreams

In the run up to the first Advent the elderly Zechariah and Elizabeth had a surprise child who turned out to be the blessed John the Baptist. Their shame was transmuted into an unexpected blessing. Advent is a time that reminds us that our Father in Heaven cares about the hurts and sorrows of our broken dreams. He does not just slap our broken dreams back together the way we want it. Rather, our Father re-forges our broken dreams into unexpected new prospects, pregnant with beautiful blessings. 

Disclaimer: I wrote the post below for an Advent Meditation for First Presbyterian Church, Houston. http://fpchouston.org/am-site/media/devo-week-one-pdf.pdf

The season of Advent conjures up the image of the pondering Mary. This image is poignant, especially, as I reckon Mary to be a peasant teenager whose dreams of marriage were almost broken by news of the miraculous pregnancy. This Advent, being the tenth consecutive year away from family, my ponderings have been pervaded by the idea of broken dreams.

Growing up, I dreamed that I would be married and have a family of my own by the time I was like 30 years old. Now at 34, not yet married, feeling unsettled, sometimes it feels like I am living in the wake of the broken dream. Reckoning with broken dreams creates doubts—sometimes doubting God’s provision, other times doubting self-efficacy. The fruit of doubt is shame!

Shame is a significant human emotion in the Bible. When Adam and Eve broke the blessed order of creation, they were overwhelmed by the emotion of shame. Perhaps it shouldn’t be surprising that Luke’s Gospel starts with a story of shame—Zechariah, the old priest at the temple, and his wife Elizabeth who bore the shame of being childless. Theirs was a story of a broken dream. Their story is paradigmatic of all human lives with broken dreams—not having that dream job we always wanted, our spouse not quite living up to our idealized dream/image, our children’s lives getting derailed from their dreams, our loved one dying prematurely or unexpectedly incurring a long-term disability. Our lives are strewn with broken dreams because we live in a broken world.

In the run up to the first Advent the elderly Zechariah and Elizabeth had a surprise child who turned out to be the blessed John the Baptist. Their shame was transmuted into an unexpected blessing. Advent is a time that reminds us that our Father in Heaven cares about the hurts and sorrows of our broken dreams. He does not just slap our broken dreams back together the way we want it. Rather, our Father re-forges our broken dreams into unexpected new prospects, pregnant with beautiful blessings.

This Advent we don’t have to be stuck pinning over broken dreams or pondering our doubts or wallowing secretly in our shame. Rather, meditating in the Gospels about the love of our Lord Jesus Christ, we can be moved, by the power of the Holy Spirit, to full faith in our Father in Heaven who re-forges our broken dreams into a new beautiful blessedness!

Most Important New Year’s Resolution: Making Space

One way to counteract modernism’s corrosive nature is to consciously make space for God’s presence. One important way of this making space is performing ceaseless prayers. I have found it to be most useful for my life is to say short prayers through the day, “Father have mercy on me.” “Father take care.” “Jesus, Son of God have mercy on me.”

I think the most important New Year’s resolution for me is to make space – make space for increased awareness of God’s presence in my life. Augustine says, “my soul is too crampled for your to enter it – widen it out. It is in disrepair – restore it.” 

Spiritual growth happens when we make space for God’s presence in our lives. Modernity with its pervasive materialism and cognitive overload, which comes by the way of hoarded homes and the buzz of social media frazzling our mind, makes it difficult to make space for God’s presence in our lives.

One way to counteract modernism’s corrosive nature is to consciously make space for God’s presence. One important way of this making space is performing ceaseless prayers. I have found it to be most useful for my life is to say short prayers through the day, “Father have mercy on me.” “Father take care.” “Jesus, Son of God have mercy on me.”

Taking a quick moment at different points in the day to say these prayers helps me be aware of God’s presence through the day. This way of making space for God’s presence mitigates modernity’s inexorable chipping away of my spirit; thus fostering spiritual growth.

10 Lonely Christmases of Seeing the Face of Jesus

 I think my compulsive attending of multiple Christmas services over the past 10 years helped me reach a deep place in my soul where I catch a glimpse of the face of Christ. The Christmas songs were an opportunity to meditate on the face of Christ. Then the kind, grieving, loving face of Christ comforts me in my loneliness. The price to pay for my lonely Christmases is the deeper vision of face of Christ and it is worth it. After all, this gazing on God is the highest of all pleasures which David talks about in Psalm 27:4 “One thing I ask from the Lord, this only do I seek: that I may dwell in the house of the Lord all the days of my life, to gaze on the beauty of the Lord and to seek him in his temple.”

This is my 10th consecutive Christmas being away from family. As I look back, with each Christmas I have been having a richer and deeper experience of Christmas – one that gives me deeper glimpses of God in Christ. 

The upside of not having a family to celebrate Christmas with is that I have a lot of time to do many things. A tradition I have developed through the lonely Christmases is to go to multiple Christmas services. Following my lonely Christmas tradition, yesterday, for Christmas eve, I went to 3 services. I started off with a service at 7 Mile Road, which is my friend’s Church plant. Then I went to the 9 pm service at First Presbyterian Church, my home church. Then I went to the 10:30 pm service at St. Martin’s Episcopal church, being the sucker for sacraments that I am I couldn’t resist the option to make Christmas service the Eucharist service.

This year, I reflected on the question of what my lonely Christmas tradition has amounted to, if at all anything. One, I realized that the Christmas services are the best worshipful times of the year for me. Two, when I sing Christmas songs over and over again on the same evening, I feel myself standing alongside the Shepherds spiritually seeing the Infinite take flesh in the finite as the babe Jesus Christ. Three, every year as Christmas comes and goes, I seem to be able to spiritually see the face of Christ more and more clearly.

The point about seeing the face of Christ is something that has been deeply impressed upon me since my reading Shusaku Endo’s book Silence. The book is about Jesuit Priests being persecuted by Japanese Samurai in the 17th century. During the persecution the Priest Rodrigues repeatedly meditates on the face of Christ. He is constantly meditating on the details of the scenes from the Gospel. This is what gives him the strength to suffer for the sake of the Gospel. 

As I look back, I think my compulsive attending of multiple Christmas services over the past 10 years helped me reach a deep place in my soul where I catch a glimpse of the face of Christ. The Christmas songs were an opportunity to meditate on the face of Christ. Then the kind, grieving, loving face of Christ comforts me in my loneliness. The price to pay for my lonely Christmases is the deeper vision of face of Christ and it is worth it. After all, this gazing on God is the highest of all pleasures which David talks about in Psalm 27:4 “One thing I ask from the Lord, this only do I seek: that I may dwell in the house of the Lord all the days of my life, to gaze on the beauty of the Lord and to seek him in his temple.”

On Why Unhappiness is Not a bad thing!

Happiness is an allegory as happiness is always pointing to something else. One does not get to rest in happiness. On the other hand unhappiness makes for a better story because suffering and struggle makes for a good story. If the prince did not have to suffer crossing seven seas, climbing seven mountains, defeating seven monsters to get to the princess, it wouldn’t be meaningful story or romance. In fact, one could almost say, blessed are the unhappy for it makes their story more meaningful (Matt 5:4). That is why unhappiness in not (always) a bad things after all.

Haruki Murakami in his book Kafka On the Shore says, “…like Tolstoy said. Happiness is an allegory, unhappiness a story.” Reading this I was reminded about two things. One, the TV series Mad Men. Two, Tolkien’s book The Hobbit.

John Hamm, playing the central character Don Draper in the Mad Men TV series, is a hedonistic ad man who loves to get his way in the advertising industry. Once, a smug CEO tells John Hamm, “We are happy with our current agency. Why would we want to do business with you?”. Hamm replies, “You say you are happy with your current plan but what is happiness except that which you feel before you want more of it.” Happiness is always a moving target. The moment you think you have arrived, happiness is the next thing – always pointing to something else. An allegory is always pointing to something else. Happiness is an allegory.

In the Hobbit, Gandalf gets thirteen dwarfes and the hobbit Bilbo to go on an adventure brimming with hardships. Every time Bilbo faces hardships, whether it be fighting the trolls or getting drenched in the rain, Bilbo wishes he were back in his cozy home sitting by the fire with a cup of tea and a slice of cake (so British!). Bilbo’s team faces many hardship in their journey until they reach Rivendel, the Elf land, where they rest for 2 weeks. Tolkien says there was nothing really to report on the 2 week stay in the Elf paradise, as it was period of happiness and peace. The story starts again when they leave Rivendel to face the next stage of hardships in their journey towards the lonely mountain. It is being disturbed from our happy homeostasis that makes for a good story. 

Happiness is an allegory as happiness is always pointing to something else. One does not get to rest in happiness. On the other hand unhappiness makes for a better story because suffering and struggle makes for a good story. If the prince did not have to suffer crossing seven seas, climbing seven mountains, defeating seven monsters to get to the princess, it wouldn’t be meaningful story or romance. In fact, one could almost say, blessed are the unhappy for it makes their story more meaningful (Matt 5:4). That is why unhappiness in not (always) a bad things after all.

Ps: Want to read more about what makes stories meaningful? Here is one way A Way of Stories…

A Way of Stories vs the Bottom-line Culture

In as much as our lives do not have hope for redemption, our stories seem meaningless. If there are no stories worth living for, then we end up living for something else – money, power or knowledge. In as much as our identities are solely determined by the bottom-lines factors of money, power or knowledge we end up living lives of shunted humanity. In as much as we take a step back from our bottom-line obsessions with money, power and knowledge, we will see that there are richer stories to be lived with eternal hope (Rev 21:4) in which our stories will be redeemed.

One of my very good friends in Houston, Henry Bragg, invited me to go see the movie “A Story Film” made by John Eldredge (author of Wild at Heart) and his crew. The movie attempts to help us look at our lives in terms of a story in order to help us gain self-understanding. This narrative self understanding is a very important to prevent ourselves from being being boxed-in by bottom-line-culture. What I mean by bottom-line-culture is that we live in a culture which tends to define us by some basic common denominators which often happens to be related to money or knowledge or power. A story-culture is the anti-thesis to the bottom-line-culture. Knowing people through their life stories gives us a deeper sense of ourselves and people around us than if were to use money, power or knowledge as the only criteria to know/judge people. 

What is interesting about the movie is that John Eldredge and his crew of 6 guys attempt to go on an adventerous journey to “find the story that tells their personal stories.” For the Eldredge crew, given that most of them had not driven motorcycles in any form prior hand, to go on a 10 day trip riding off-road motorcycles is an adventure indeed. Seeing the 6 guys wrestle with excitement and nervousness about the trip gives the movie a touch of authenticity. Finding stories which tell our personal storyhelps us gain true self-understanding.

One may ask, how does living an adventurous story help in self-understanding? Bart Erhman, Eldredge’s friend, gives a clue to the answer. Once when Bart went flying he had to land on a short landing strip, he ended up crashing his flight because of his mis-calculation. His co-pilot later told him that when the flight crashed and was sliding like 500 yeards, Bart, frustrated that his mistake caused the crash, kept banging his fist on the dashboard and yelling at himself, “you miserable piece of s***.” When we are stressed, the facade which we project about us to the world outside falls off and what we truly think about ourselves gets exposed. The failure of landing the flight helped Bart know what he really thought about himself. Failure in our story is not to be hidden, it is a place rich for exploration of our identities to find how we really see ourselves as.

Failure in story helps in self-understanding. Self-understanding paves way for us to find completion or redemption. Eldredge says, “a good story is one that will account for the beauty and the loss (suffering) in life”. Being able to account for beauty and suffering gives ones life deep meaning. Eldredge’s friend, another psychologist, on the trip says, “beauty destroys our fears”. After all, is it the beauty of the maiden princess that fuels the prince to suffer crossing seven mountains and defeating seven monsters. The end of the story gives meaning to the story. Unredeemed stories leave us with a sense that someone is missing. Like in every time I see the movie “Titanic”, I feel something is missing because the movie did not end with redemption. Good art is something that stirs us to look for what is missing in our real life. It fuels our search for redemption.

In as much as the story ends with redemption then the story seems worth the suffering and loss. The root cause of modern anxiety is that we do not have any hope that our stories will end with true redemption. In a Godless world, notes Eldredge, the beginning of the world is seen as a random accident. Consequently, hope for redemption in such an accidental world is implausible. In as much as our lives do not have hope for redemption, our stories seem meaningless. If there are no stories worth living for, then we end up living for something else – money, power or knowledge. In as much as our identities are solely determined by success in the bottom-lines factors of money, power or knowledge we end up reducing our humanity to those shallow bottom-lines. In as much as we take a step back from our bottom-line obsessions with money, power and knowledge, we will see that there are richer stories to be lived with eternal hope (Rev 21:4) in which our stories will be redeemed. Knowing ourselves through our life-stories instead of forming our identities around the bottom-lines of money, power or knowledge helps us deeply know our failures, be more aware of our need for redemption and thus live more meaningful life-stories. 

 

Ps: Though I really enjoyed some part of the movie, I at least have a three fold critique of the movie. Firstly, in spite of some good insights, the movie does not quite cohere together. The adventure in the movie does not have a moment of real failure. Unless there is real failure, there is no need for redemption. May be if they had gone on a month long trip instead of a 10 day trip then the crew would have faced real failure and it would have been interesting to see how they are redeemed from that. Without any real failure, much of the movie was just talk. This went against one of the fundamental principles of film making that a good film is to be more seen than heard. Secondly, a good movie as the director Ridley Scott says is about a conflict over some value. A part of the problem with film is that the movie does not have a conflict over a value. In my blog here, I have tried to compare the story way of life vs a bottom-line way of life in order it bring out the contrast that was missing in the movie. Thirdly, the editors should have cut out the last 20 minutes of the film which is a panel discussion intended to create interest in order to get the audience to follow more of the film on the website. What made the movie interesting was the casual style with impromptu dialog laden with disparate insights. The 20 minutes long panel discussion at the end was too formal and badly edited leaving a bad after taste.

A Drilling (lesson) on Faith from My Motorcycle Mechanic

I have to remind myself that to have faith is to trust that the Father in Heaven knows what He is doing better than I do. If I am able to trust my motorcycle to my mechanic and teeth to my dentist, then by God, I should be able to trust my life to the hands of the Father in Heaven even when I feel like wanting to freak out! 

I took my Motorcycle to my mechanic because it was acting up. My mechanic said it looked like a problem with my carburetor. He took a electric drill to my carburetor and made a hole. He then turned to me with a sheepish smile and asked, “you really trust me don’t you.” I replied, “I do.” He said, “Most motorcycle owners freak-out when I take a drill to the carburetor because they think I don’t know what I am doing… The thing is, I needed to make a hole in the casing to get to the carburetor. Only those who trust that I know what I am doing do not freak-out. It is at such moments that I know if they truly trust me as a good mechanic.”

Sometimes events happen in our lives that cause us to feel like we are being drilled out. However, faith is about trusting God to take a drill to my life while resting in the assurance that He knows what He is doing better than I do. I had to recently endure a root canal in which I had to trust that my dentist know what he is doing better than I do and yield myself to his skill. If I were to freak-out every time I heard the dentist’s drill get close to my teeth, I will end up with unclean teeth.

After having quit a rather lucrative job in the software world to go to seminary in order to follow my call into ministry I have my moments of freaking-out. Sometimes I find myself asking, “Father, what on earth are you doing to me?” At such moments, I have to remind myself that to have faith is to trust that the Father in Heaven knows what He is doing better than I do. If I am able to trust my motorcycle to my mechanic and teeth to my dentist, then by God, I should be able to trust my life to the hands of the Father in Heaven even when I feel like wanting to freak out! After all, God works ALL things for the good of those who love Him – Rom 8:28.

Tick! Tick! Tick! goes Life

Tick! Tick! Tick! goes Life

A perpetual loss
Of time
Of loved ones
Of precious moments

All is evanescence
All lost into oblivion
Is the ticket worth it, Alyosha? 
Or can the earth be kissed, Ivan?

But oh wait!

Little buds becoming roses
Little babies becoming lovers
Time becoming blessedness
New Creation coming into Being.

Tick! Tick! Tick! goes Life.